SB 3.26.28

yad vidur hy aniruddhākhyaṁ
 hṛṣīkāṇām adhīśvaram
śāradendīvara-śyāmaṁ
 saṁrādhyaṁ yogibhiḥ śanaiḥ
Synonyms: 
yat — which mind; viduḥ — is known; hi — indeed; aniruddha-ākhyam — by the name Aniruddha; hṛṣīkāṇām — of the senses; adhīśvaram — the supreme ruler; śārada — autumnal; indīvara — like a blue lotus; śyāmam — bluish; saṁrādhyam — who is found; yogibhiḥ — by the yogīs; śanaiḥ — gradually.
Translation: 
The mind of the living entity is known by the name of Lord Aniruddha, the supreme ruler of the senses. He possesses a bluish-black form resembling a lotus flower growing in the autumn. He is found slowly by the yogīs.
Purport: 

The system of yoga entails controlling the mind, and the Lord of the mind is Aniruddha. It is stated that Aniruddha is four-handed, with Sudarśana cakra, conchshell, club and lotus flower. There are twenty-four forms of Viṣṇu, each differently named. Among these twenty-four forms, Saṅkarṣaṇa, Aniruddha, Pradyumna and Vāsudeva are depicted very nicely in the Caitanya-caritāmṛta, where it is stated that Aniruddha is worshiped by the yogīs. Meditation upon voidness is a modern invention of the fertile brain of some speculator. Actually the process of yoga meditation, as prescribed in this verse, should be fixed upon the form of Aniruddha. By meditating on Aniruddha one can become free from the agitation of acceptance and rejection. When one’s mind is fixed upon Aniruddha, one gradually becomes God-realized; he approaches the pure status of Kṛṣṇa consciousness, which is the ultimate goal of yoga.