SB 3.11.31

tāvat tri-bhuvanaṁ sadyaḥ
 kalpāntaidhita-sindhavaḥ
plāvayanty utkaṭāṭopa-
 caṇḍa-vāteritormayaḥ
Synonyms: 
tāvat — then; tri-bhuvanam — all the three worlds; sadyaḥ — immediately after; kalpa-anta — in the beginning of the devastation; edhita — inflated; sindhavaḥ — all the oceans; plāvayanti — inundate; utkaṭa — violent; āṭopa — agitation; caṇḍa — hurricane; vāta — by winds; īrita — blown; ūrmayaḥ — waves.
Translation: 
At the beginning of the devastation all the seas overflow, and hurricane winds blow very violently. Thus the waves of the seas become ferocious, and in no time at all the three worlds are full of water.
Purport: 

It is said that the blazing fire from the mouth of Saṅkarṣaṇa rages for one hundred years of the demigods, or 36,000 human years. Then for another 36,000 years there are torrents of rain, accompanied by violent winds and waves, and the seas and oceans overflow. These reactions of 72,000 years are the beginning of the partial devastation of the three worlds. People forget all these devastations of the worlds and think themselves happy in the material progress of civilization. This is called māyā, or “that which is not.”